Juneteenth

Today in 1865, the Union general who had just taken charge of Galveston and assumed the military governorship of Texas, issued an order that “in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free.” This surprised no one, since the arrival of the Union army had meant freedom in fact since fairly early on the war and in law since the Emancipation Proclamation. But it mattered in that as of that date not a single slave remained in the United States.

Andy Hall has much more over at Dead Confederates.

If national holidays express something about national values, or at least what the nation wants its values to seem like, why have we not made Juneteenth one of them? I always hear about how the United States is a free country. Americans love their freedom. Doesn’t the literal end of slavery in America count as freedom?

I think so, but I forgot Juneteenth. I roused myself from bed today with thoughts of the Gadsden Purchase and some shopping I need to do. I never heard of the holiday until the internet told me about it a few years back. One would think that a nation so obsessed with freedom would treat it, or maybe the day of the Emancipation Proclamation, as a second Fourth of July. I’m not a patriotic person. Most of the flag waving celebrations leave me cold, but even I know when it’s the Fourth. Juneteenth is recognized in my state, as in forty-one others, but we can probably all see how much that has done to raise its profile.

I suppose it gets ignored for the same reason we ignore Emancipation Day. To make a national fuss over it would require us to grapple with slavery and own up to freedom as a kind of national project, not a crystallized perfection handed down from men in powdered wigs.

 
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One comment on “Juneteenth

  1. […] Update 3, June 19, 2013: Freedmen’s Patrol nails the general public’s ambivalence about Juneteenth: […]

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